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There is a predicted dramatic increase in Type 2 Diabetes in the population in addition to those earlier in life with insulin dependent type 1 diabetes. Having diabetes does not necessarily mean that your sight will be affected but if it is early diagnosis and treatment is essential to stop reduction or loss of vision.

There is a predicted dramatic increase in Type 2 Diabetes in the population in addition to those earlier in life with insulin dependent type 1 diabetes. Having diabetes does not necessarily mean that your sight will be affected but if it is early diagnosis and treatment is essential to stop reduction or loss of vision. All diabetics are allowed a free sight examination with an optometrist each year or more often if deemed necessary. You may not recognise any symptoms in its early stages but this is the crucial time to act and prevent blindness. Because the most dramatic effects are caused by “leaky blood vessels” in the back of the eye your eyecare professional can se the earliest signs of the effects of diabetes and with modern photographic instrumentation can plot and monitor the speed of change and act accordingly working closely with your diabetic and eyecare specialist in your local hospital.
As well as leaky blood vessels blocking the sensitivity of vision cells, they can also become blocked which initiates the eye to start growing new ones often wrongly situated causing more vision loss and in long term cases retinal detachment.

Once again not smoking and a careful control of cholesterol, sugar intake and blood pressure will reduce the risks of vision reduction in diabetes and can be detected by leaking blood vessels in the back of the eye within the retina which can cause blindness. However, many optometrists rely on ophthalmoscopes to get a reasonable view of the retina.

Andrew Coombes, a consultant eye surgeon at Barts and the London NHS Trust explains. “ It’s been more difficult with the equipment they’ve had to carefully examine the back of the eye, in particular, the whole retina and the point where the optic nerve joins it. The digital imaging techniques now available allow us to examine these vital structures at our leisure. A lot of opticians are embracing this and have exploited diagnostic potential.”High-resolution images of the retina at the back of the eye can reveal breaks or abnormalities in blood vessels that might suggest circulation problems or hypertension. Inflammation of the optic nerve can sometimes indicate multiple sclerosis. Small blobs of cholesterol in the retina can indicate high stroke risk. Coombes has received referrals from opticians using high-tech scanning techniques, who have been concerned by swelling at the back of the eye, the sign of a possible brain tumour, or signs of glaucoma (damage to the optic nerve caused by high pressure in the eye).

As we have said in the section on the new role of Optometrists, they are more knowledgeable and have access to more superior and clinical equipment providing a greater in depth understanding of the eye and its weaknesses and future disorders, and this leads to the tell tale signs of general body illnesses and symptoms and therefore the eye becomes the best place to monitor our overall health. Not surprising then that many optometrists, especially the Independents are offering enhanced eye examinations.

Be prepared to pay extra, for these opticians are offering high-tech tests involving digital photography, laser scanning, and an assessment of your eye’s physical well being that can provide an early diagnosis of other health problems too.

As well as leaky blood vessels blocking the sensitivity of vision cells, they can also become blocked which initiates the eye to start growing new ones often wrongly situated causing more vision loss and in long term cases retinal detachment.

Once again not smoking and a careful control of cholesterol, sugar intake and blood pressure will reduce the risks of vision reduction in diabetes and can be detected by leaking blood vessels in the back of the eye within the retina which can cause blindness. However, many optometrists rely on ophthalmoscopes to get a reasonable view of the retina.

Andrew Coombes, a consultant eye surgeon at Barts and the London NHS Trust explains. “ It’s been more difficult with the equipment they’ve had to carefully examine the back of the eye, in particular, the whole retina and the point where the optic nerve joins it. The digital imaging techniques now available allow us to examine these vital structures at our leisure. A lot of opticians are embracing this and have exploited diagnostic potential.”High-resolution images of the retina at the back of the eye can reveal breaks or abnormalities in blood vessels that might suggest circulation problems or hypertension. Inflammation of the optic nerve can sometimes indicate multiple sclerosis. Small blobs of cholesterol in the retina can indicate high stroke risk. Coombes has received referrals from opticians using high-tech scanning techniques, who have been concerned by swelling at the back of the eye, the sign of a possible brain tumour, or signs of glaucoma (damage to the optic nerve caused by high pressure in the eye).

As we have said in the section on the new role of Optometrists, they are more knowledgeable and have access to more superior and clinical equipment providing a greater in depth understanding of the eye and its weaknesses and future disorders, and this leads to the tell tale signs of general body illnesses and symptoms and therefore the eye becomes the best place to monitor our overall health. Not surprising then that many optometrists, especially the Independents are offering enhanced eye examinations.

Be prepared to pay extra, for these opticians are offering high-tech tests involving digital photography, laser scanning, and an assessment of your eye’s physical well being that can provide an early diagnosis of other health problems too.

There is a predicted dramatic increase in Type 2 Diabetes in the population in addition to those earlier in life with insulin dependent type 1 diabetes. Having diabetes does not necessarily mean that your sight will be affected but if it is early diagnosis and treatment is essential to stop reduction or loss of vision. All diabetics are allowed a free sight examination with an optometrist each year or more often if deemed necessary. You may not recognise any symptoms in its early stages but this is the crucial time to act and prevent blindness. Because the most dramatic effects are caused by “leaky blood vessels” in the back of the eye your eyecare professional can se the earliest signs of the effects of diabetes and with modern photographic instrumentation can plot and monitor the speed of change and act accordingly working closely with your diabetic and eyecare specialist in your local hospital.